Grandmother had all four limbs amputated after contracting sepsis.

Sepsis can often develop from the smallest of things. A simple paper cut can result in infection and could lead to amputation.

In 2018, 54-year-old’s Marguerite Henderson from Fife, Scotland contracted sepsis from a paper cut, reported the Mirror.

On 25 February 2018, the 54-year-old cut her right-hand’s index finger.

Few days later the small cut caused her to feel unwell. The former nurse began to be unable to walk, was turning grey and her lips turned blue.

Ms Henderson was soon rushed to the Victoria Hospital in Kirkcaldy, where her organs began to fail. She received high-strength antibiotics and was induced into a coma for a week.

As she lay in coma, the family of the grandmother was told to prepare for her potential death.

Fortunately, Ms Henderson woke. However, because of the infection, she was left with permanent limbs damage.

The doctors informed Ms Henderson and her two children that she had contracted sepsis. Both her arms and legs must be amputated.

On 3 April 2018, she went through an operation to remove her hands. As her health deteriorated, she had to be rushed to the Ninewells Hospital in Dundee two weeks later to have her legs amputated.

Despite the tragedy, Ms Henderson is making a good recovery and is determined to return to being more independent. We find this admirable and wish her all the best.

Whilst she has heard of sepsis before, Ms Henderson was unaware of its symptoms. Therefore, we advise that everyone familiarises themselves with the symptoms of sepsis, as early recognition can make a massive difference in the treatment.

So, what are the symptoms of sepsis? In babies and young children, these can be:

  • Looking mottled, pale or bluish.
  • Breathing very fast.
  • Being very lethargic or difficult to wake.
  • Having fits or convulsions.
  • Feeling abnormally cold to touch.
  • Having a rash that does not fade when you press it.

In older children and adults, early signs may include:

  • A high temperature or a low body temperature.
  • Problems or changes in breathing.
  • Chills and shivering.
  • Feeling or acting differently from normal.
  • A fast heartbeat.

More information can be found on the NHS website.

Whilst Ms Henderson did not suffer because of hospital’s delay in treatment or inappropriate care, many people do. Amputation following sepsis can often happen due to medical negligence.

You may be eligible to make a Medical Negligence claim if you have suffered from sepsis and there was a delay in your treatment, you experienced misdiagnosis or receive insufficient care. We could help you receive the compensation you are entitled to.

Just contact our friendly team on 0151 306 3694 and we will provide a free consultation. To our clients, we can offer experienced medical experts and rehabilitation anywhere in the country. You will not have to worry about paying legal fees upfront, as we offer no win, no fee agreement. Fill out a claim form here.